Optimistically Cautious

Thursday, February 07, 2008

Edmonton Opera: "H.M.S. Pinafore"

I had heard about Edmonton Opera's Explorers' Club a few years ago, but it didn't seem economical to join until I read about their 2007/2008 lineup. The venerable Stewart Lemoine would be rewriting Gilbert & Sullivan's H.M.S. Pinafore, and thus, even if I didn't use my membership to purchase tickets for the other shows that season, it would still be worthwhile.

As the play neared, it was released that Jeff Haslam would be among the cast members. At the time, I thought his involvement was more of a token gesture; a thoughtful inclusion of a longtime Teatro associate. Little did I know that he would play a leading role, if not one that upstaged the rest of the cast all together.

While this was my first opera, it wasn't my first experience at the opera. I had volunteered during the earlier run of Carmen, so I knew that many, if not most of the patrons dressed to the nines (yes, cocktail dresses and four-inch heels in the dead of winter). The majority of the audience was not surprisingly comprised of the older set, though I do think the Explorers' Club is doing a fine job of trying to foster appreciation of this art form with younger professionals.

I convinced Mack that the Opera Talk prior to curtain was a good way to orient ourselves to the history, plotline and characters of Pinafore, so we arrived earlier enough to join a modest crowd in the Kasaa lobby. I didn't understand all of Dr. David Cook's jokes, but the overview of the story would be helpful to my appreciation of the show later on. Mack and I both thought that he seemed a little too keen on Jeff Haslam, however.

I don't know Gilbert & Sullivan well enough (well, at all, really) to recognize how Lemoine "improved" the script, but in the end, Pinafore really didn't seem like that much of a leap for him - farce is his specialty, romance his standard, and unusual settings his forte. This opera could be considered typical Lemoine...with musical interludes. I will admit that it was no small joy on being able to hear "He is an Englishman" sung live, as it was used in one of my favorite episodes of West Wing ("It's from Penzance!" "No, it was from Pinafore!"). And Haslam? He was tailor-made for the role of flamboyant, self-centered Sir Joseph Porter, so much so that I can't help but think that Lemoine must have specifically requested his participation, as the part was undoubtedly written with him in mind. He was hilarious in his mannerisms, delivery, and even his uproarious laughter (because no one has a cackle as distinctive as his).

As for the production itself, I had a few nitpicks. The lighting was odd throughout, bordering on distracting, actually (was the blue, spinning, simulation of the waves really necessary?). It also seemed that the costume designers should have given Ralph Rackstraw's character some kind of distinctive piece to wear; otherwise, he too easily blended in with the rest of the ship's crew. The symmetrical set was functional and allowed for great visuals and movement during the chorus numbers, but I couldn't see how it was as "special" as continuously touted in the program and in the show's introduction by Artistic Director Brian Deedrick.

As a member of the Explorers' Club, Mack and I were able to partake in a pizza and beer reception during intermission. Getting to and from the second balcony to the basement of the Jubilee Auditorium in twenty minutes was a slight challenge though.

Opera really isn't my area of expertise, but all I hear is how expensive it is to produce, and how ticket prices barely cover the costs (Deedrick offered the statistic that only 42% is reimbursed through ticket sales, while the rest is supported by government donations and private sponsorship). If that's the case, isn't it possible to offer more than three shows, given what must be a very large overhead to construct sets and costume from scratch, on top of rehearsals and expenses that I can't even begin to know? Perhaps there isn't enough demand (or people who can afford to see it) in Edmonton, but it just seems an extraordinary waste of resources to only offer three opportunities to see a very good local production.

I'd like to attend Falstaff in the spring (my last chance to get "cheap" tickets this year), and I do think that will be a more genuine litmus test as to whether or not I truly enjoy opera. Pinafore was a treat, there being just a slim chance that I wouldn't find it entertaining - it was in English (making the availability of supertitles less of an issue), penned by Lemoine, featuring Haslam, and more light hearted than what I'd expect from more traditional operas. This was "opera-lite", so after Falstaff, I will reassess my feeling about the medium then.

Haslam in H.M.S. Pinafore

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